Why does fiction have to be logical when real life makes no damn sense at all?


While working on the current novel, I managed to line up a few beta readers. Total excitement. I’d never had beta readers before. What would they tell me? Would they make me cry? Would they stroke my ego. Would they love the book or hate it? Would I (in the end) acknowledge that I’m not creative after all and set up an affiliate website selling info products? Would they give me insight or would I be incited to violence. I just didn’t know.

After weeks of patiently waiting. Not really patient. Pretty much impatient. Actually very impatient. I finally heard back from one of my guys. The feed back was pretty nice but there were a few things I needed clarified, so I sent a follow up email with questions. Easy-peesey, right?

The answers were where the real nitty-gritty came out. It’s not that I disagreed with the answers, or even got upset. But they did present a problem. A major premise of the story, according to the beta, was not believable. Yikes!

So, I thought about it. I asked other people about it. I thought about it some more. I tried to come up with a way around it, because if I gave in, then well you know, rewrites.

I even had an eight part email fly back and forth between me and another reader about how it could be fixed. Oddly, I was the one playing devil’s advocate when the poor girl was fighting for my premise.

In the end, I decided the beta was right. It had to change. I had to change because you know, readers, they don’t like illogical things in their books. It’s a rule. I don’t know who wrote the rule, but I’m very sure it’s an official, carved in stone rule.

Real Life vs. Fictional Real Life

But even though I did agree with the beta it got me thinking. This rule about how fiction has to be logical. Has to be ‘believable’ when real life is anything but that. Let’s face it, real life is crazy, even on a good day. Nothing makes sense from the small (why is he driving that way?) to the huge (we’re going to war because of what?).

And examples of the illogic of life are everywhere:

  • Beautiful women married to fat ugly men
  • Pajama wearing, self-made millionaires who got rich selling ‘information’
  • James Carville and Mary Matalin
  • Animals rights activists who are against killing animals but for abortion
  • Politicians get elected for criticizing their predecessors for the exact things they do once in office
  • Reality TV
  • How Facebook apparently kills brain cells
  • Half the things you see (and can’t un-see) in emergency rooms
  • Atheists using the phrase “Oh My God”
  • Good people dying
  • Bad people getting rich
  • Chocolate cake with Diet Coke
  • Running or bicycling along high traffic roads (with plenty of exhaust)
  • Hard workers get fired
  • In America dead people vote in every election

Plot point? What plot point?

In fiction every scene, every action, and every bit of dialogue has to move the plot forward. If it doesn’t, it’s cut. But does life follow plot points? Is there some logical path that life takes that leads us to the Promised Land or our dreams or goals? Hell no. Musicians slave away at bar and top-40 gigs all to get their big breaks, while some pimply faced 13 year old becomes a sensation because of a video posted on YouTube. Life is completely unconcerned with moving the story forward. Rather it pushes in every direction possible away from forward.

But even despite all this. Despite the fact that life is truly stranger than fiction I think I understand why fiction has to make sense, has to be logical and follow through to the end. It’s because we humans have to see something resolved. We have to see somebody reach their goal. We have to see somebody get their happily ever after. I mean, let’s face it, we don’t read so we can get reality, right? We read to escape. We read so we can become someone else for a while. Live their life, which is typically much more interesting than our own. We read to immerse ourselves into a risk free adventure. We read for relief from all that ails us.

When we’re done with our mini vacation from life we can return, perhaps a little calmer, maybe even a little wiser, and ready once again to deal with all the glorious illogic of real life.

Feel free to argue, agree, or contradict me in the comments.

Writer Chick
Copyright 2014

9 responses

  1. I can think of explanations for most of the illogical examples you list, except for the one that made me laugh out loud. Carville and Matalin. Those two have fascinated me for years. There is absolutely no explanation for them. They’re the oddest couple I can think of, yet they seem totally devoted to one another.

    1. LOL, really? Even for reality TV? ;) It’s funny when I made that list I thought you were one person who would get a kick out of the Carville/Matalin point. I guess the old opposites attract adage applies there.

      Annie

      1. The primary explanation for for reality TV is $$$. It’s much, much cheaper to produce than scripted, acted material.

      2. Yeah but that doesn’t make it logical. Just profitable. LOL.

  2. One of the things they taught us in photography was that it’s okay to crop images because our brains are wired to automatically fill in the missing pieces. I guess it’s hard for our brains to do that with writing unless the missing details make logical sense…

    1. Hey Beet,
      Haven’t seen you in a month of Sundays. Although I see your art on FB sometimes. You rawk.

      Interesting datum about photography, I didn’t know that but it does make sense. I think in writing, there is some of that to some degree because the mind does try to make things make sense. But when you’re dealing with just words and no images I think generally it’s harder for the brain to process. But I could be wrong.

      Are you still blogging? If so, leave a link to your blog, would you?

      Thanks, doll!

      Annie

      1. :) I still hang about sometimes lol

        http://beetsart.wordpress.com/

      2. Cool. Linked ya. Haha, now I can hunt you down. ;)

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